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Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic we are limiting our patient encounters to those requiring emergency care, wound care and post-operative care.

We are happy to announce that you can now video visit with one of our providers online through Medeo, a secure video-conferencing technology that connects practitioners with patients for virtual care purposes. You can conduct a video visit using a computer (with webcam), tablet, or smartphone.
To learn more about the Medeo technology we use, watch this segment featured on CTV News.

To get started, contact Foot Care Institute to book an appointment (just like any other visit) and indicate that you would like to see one of our providers for a video visit online. Once we’ve determined that your visit is suitable for virtual care, we will arrange a VIRTUAL CARE appointment time with you and you will receive an email invitation which will guide you through the sign-up process.

Book a video visit now by calling 519-258-3668 or email us at info@footcareinstitute.ca

Sever's Disease

Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

Sever’s disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis is a common bone disorder that occurs during childhood. The disease is defined as an inflammation of the growth plate in the heel. When a child has a growth spurt, his heel bone grows faster than the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in his leg. This disease is a result of overuse. The people who are most likely to be affected by this disease are children who are in a growth spurt, especially boys who are from the ages of 5 to 13 years old. 60% of children with Sever’s disease have both heels involved.

Symptoms of this disease are heel pain that intensifies during running and jumping activities. The pain is typically localized to the posterior part of the heel. Symptoms may be severe, and they can easily interfere with daily activities. Children who play soccer, baseball, and basketball are more likely to develop Sever’s disease.

Your doctor will diagnose your child based on his or her symptoms, x-rays are generally not helpful in diagnosing this disease. Your doctor may examine both heels and ask your child questions about his or her activity level in sports. Your doctor may then use the squeeze test on your child’s heel to see if there is any pain. Nevertheless, some doctors might still use x-rays to rule out any other issues such as fractures, infections, and tumors.

Sever’s disease can be prevented by maintaining good flexibility while your child is growing. Another prevention method is to wear good-quality shoes that have firm support and a shock-absorbent sole. Sever’s disease can be treated by ceasing any activity that causes heel pain. You should apply ice to the injured heel for 20 minutes 3 times a day. Additionally, orthotics should be used for children who have high arches, flat feet, or bowed legs.

If you suspect your child has Sever’s disease, you should make an appointment with your podiatrist to have his or her foot examined. Your doctor may recommend nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve pain. In more severe cases, your child may need a cast to rest his or her heel. Fortunately, Sever’s disease does not cause long-term foot problems. After treatment, your child should start to feel better within two weeks to two months.

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