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Wednesday, 20 January 2021 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 18 January 2021 00:00

Patients with gout are often aware of the intense pain and discomfort this condition may cause. It is an arthritic ailment that generally affects the joints in the big toe, and can cause difficulty in walking. It quickly develops as a result of excess uric acid levels in the blood, which can be caused by high amounts of purines. These are found in the foods that are eaten, and can include red meat, shellfish, and drinks that have a large amount of sugar, including alcohol. Additionally, people who have elevated cholesterol levels, kidney disease, or are overweight may be prone to developing gout. It is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist when gout attacks are experienced.

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact the practitioners from Foot Care Institute. Our practitioners will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Windsor, ON. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Gout
Monday, 11 January 2021 00:00

A common sign of a broken toe is noticeable bruising, which usually coincides with pain and discomfort. Additionally, if the fracture is severe, the bone may protrude from the skin. A broken toe may be the result of trauma, such as a heavy object falling on it or stubbing it against a piece of furniture. After a diagnosis is determined, which generally consists of having an X-ray taken and the affected toe examined, proper treatment can begin. A common method for healing a broken toe is referred to as buddy taping. This is accomplished by taping the affected toe to the toe next to it. This is an effective method for providing the necessary stability as the healing process occurs. If the break is severe or broken in multiple spots, surgery may be necessary for proper healing. If you think your toe may be broken or you would like more information about various treatment options, please speak with a podiatrist today.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact the practitioners from Foot Care Institute. Our practitioners will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Windsor, ON. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
Monday, 04 January 2021 00:00

An ulcer that develops on the foot is a wound that may not heal. This type of ailment can cause severe pain and discomfort and is common among diabetic patients. Redness on and around the affected area is often the first sign of a foot wound, and additional symptoms can include an unpleasant odor and possible drainage. There are several reasons why foot wounds may occur. These can consist of living a sedentary lifestyle, nerve damage, or circulation problems. Additionally, medical conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes may make developing wounds on the feet more likely. If you are prone to foot wounds, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat this problem.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with the practitioners from Foot Care Institute. Our practitioners will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Windsor, ON. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
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