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Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic we are limiting our patient encounters to those requiring emergency care, wound care and post-operative care.

We are happy to announce that you can now video visit with one of our providers online through Medeo, a secure video-conferencing technology that connects practitioners with patients for virtual care purposes. You can conduct a video visit using a computer (with webcam), tablet, or smartphone.
To learn more about the Medeo technology we use, watch this segment featured on CTV News.

To get started, contact Foot Care Institute to book an appointment (just like any other visit) and indicate that you would like to see one of our providers for a video visit online. Once we’ve determined that your visit is suitable for virtual care, we will arrange a VIRTUAL CARE appointment time with you and you will receive an email invitation which will guide you through the sign-up process.

Book a video visit now by calling 519-258-3668 or email us at info@footcareinstitute.ca

Foot and Ankle Surgery

foot surgery

When it comes to receiving foot and ankle surgery, it’s typically a case by case situation. Some factors that play a role in whether or not you need surgery include the severity of your symptoms as well as your response to other conservative, noninvasive treatment methods.

There are a number of different foot and ankle conditions that may benefit from surgery as a treatment option. Bunions, hammertoe, metatarsal, ankle arthritis, Achilles tendon disorders, Morton’s neuroma, tibialis posterior disorder, and plantar fasciitis are all conditions that may require surgery as a treatment option, depending on their severity. Long-lasting pain relief is typically the biggest takeaway from having surgery performed to remedy your condition.

In order to best prepare for surgery, make sure you have a consultation with your podiatrist about your overall health, discuss any possible changes in medication, and ask any questions you may have about the procedure to go into the treatment with a clear head. In some cases, you may have to refrain from eating and drinking a few hours before the procedure, so make sure you understand what must be done on your end beforehand.

As for recovery, again, this will typically vary case by case and will be dependent on your condition and the type of surgery performed. Generally, it’s recommended that you get plenty of rest, ice the affected area, compress the wound to aid in further strain, and keep the area elevated to reduce any possible swelling. In some cases, your podiatrist may encourage you to use bandages, splints, surgical shoes, casts, crutches, orthotics, or a cane, depending on how much weight they believe your foot and ankle can bear.

If you’d like to determine whether surgery is the best option for you and your foot condition, consult with a podiatrist who will be able to give you a proper diagnosis and aid you with your decision.

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